Hop on for 72km of fun

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DIRTY BUSINESS : Don and Denny Emslie look a muddy mess after last year's Kwelera 2 Kei Mouth (K2K) event. It is almost time again for the 72km event. With the help of the generous sponsors they were able to hand over a cheque of R60 000 to African Angels last year and they are hoping to raise another R60 000 and more this year.
DIRTY BUSINESS : Don and Denny Emslie look a muddy mess after last year’s Kwelera 2 Kei Mouth (K2K) event. It is almost time again for the 72km event. With the help of the generous sponsors they were able to hand over a cheque of R60 000 to African Angels Independent School last year and they are hoping to raise another R60 000 and more this year.

Huge entry set to saddle up to raise annual funds for school

ABOUT 500 entries have already been received for the Kwelera 2 Kei Mouth 72km “fun” outride taking place from November 26.

This “pure fun race”, with 15 fun stops along the way, is organised by local community- based mountain bike club, Funtrax MTB.

The club organises the race to raise funds and create awareness for African Angels Independent School in Chintsa.

This year’s event will be the fourth charity fun ride. With the help of generous sponsors, the club were able to hand over a cheque of R60000 to African Angels last year, and are aiming to do so again this year.

Harcourts branches in East London pour their energy and resources into the day and encourage some of the riders to pay more to enter and “Ride for Education”.

Riders are spoilt with all the stops along the way, the vibrant buzz and the opportunity to spend the day with family and good friends, taking in the spectacular scenery of East London’s east coast.

“Riders leave the Crossways Village Centre at 6am on November 26 and the last cyclist usually trundles in to the Kei Mouth Country Club just before 2pm that afternoon,” Harcourts principal Penny Niemand said.

“The first cyclist makes it to the end just after 9am.”

African Angels Trust, which runs the school in Chintsa, was established in 2008 and is a non-governmental and non-profit organisation, which focuses on education.

The donations received from the race enables the school to employ an intern, who teaches Grade R.

The school’s chairwoman, Lou Billett said they would not have been able to employ someone to fill the post had it not been for the donation.

She said the school felt privileged to receive this long-term commitment.

“The close links we have formed mean a lot to us because a child does not get an education in one year, but for many years and we need to maintain that.

“Partnerships are important, not just financial ones, and we are grateful to everyone who supports the school,” she said.

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